For example, if you type in “banana bread recipe,” search engines should pull up recipes from major sites first. Posts from smaller blogs or recipes for other, related dishes—like zucchini bread—should fall toward the end of the list. As a search engine evaluator, you’ll be asked to enter specific words or phrases into a search engine, then assess how appropriate and informative the sites it pulls up are.
The editors of websites and magazines are no longer necessarily looking for a journalist degree or a lot of experience. They want to find people with real life travel experience who can captivate an audience… and they’re happy to pay for that. In this post I’m going to list 99 (yes, ninety-nine) awesome websites and magazines that you can pitch your ideas to so that you can get paid to write online.
Most people have heard of Vice these days. They have an extremely popular YouTube channel and blog that covers everything from travel to drug culture. They’re usually looking for edgy pieces that capture the imagination of their younger audience. Be warned that they don’t respond to all submissions and it will be very difficult to get published here, but the pay is good if you do.
This particular work-at-home opportunity takes a little more work experience in general than the other four on this list, but it pays better too. Search engine evaluators examine Internet search results and give feedback as to whether they are accurate, relevant, and spam-free. To do this, the evaluator must be knowledgeable about current culture and the Internet, with good communication skills. Sometimes a college degree is required or preferred, but direct experience as a search evaluator is usually not.
Although very little data are available for this work-at-home job since it is relatively new, thousands of listings for social media managers can be found on sites like CareerBuilder.com, SimplyHired.com, and Upwork.com. If you have a demonstrated command of social media and a sizable following, you might even be able to get started by reaching out to companies directly and asking if they need help.
​Be sure to check what kind of customer support you can expect from your affiliate program once you have signed up. Do your research online and if possible, speak to other sellers using the program to get their thoughts. Can you speak to someone via phone or Skype or do you have to wait 72 hours for email responses? Be clear on this because trust me, you will need support at one point or another. 
Buy underpriced used books. Outfit a phone with an ISBN reading app, scan the ISBN numbers of books at used bookstores and thrift shops, and compare the asking prices with what the books are selling for on a site like Amazon. Whenever you get a good hit (which won’t be often but, since the process is fast, won’t take long, either), buy the book and resell it online. Be discreet about this, as the store managers probably won’t like what you’re doing.
Write and publish an eBook. You don’t need a traditional publisher and financial backing to publish your own book anymore. In fact, Amazon.com makes it possible for you to publish your own eBook and sell it independently – with no financial investment on your part. And with Kindle eBook publishing, your book will appear on Kindle stores worldwide within 24-48 hours. Just be prepared to market it yourself on social media, your blog, or elsewhere if you expect to generate sales.
I recently stumbled on the Trim app and I have to say, this one is a game changer. It’s a simple app that acts as your own personal financial manager. Once you link your bank to the app, Trim analyzes your spending, finds subscriptions you need to cancel, negotiates your Comcast bill, finds you better car insurance, and more. And of course, the app is free! My bet is that it will only take a few days for Trim to put an extra $100 in your pocket. So easy!
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