•The website has no contact information. A legitimate business has a way for you to reach them. Look for an "About" page that offers information on the company or CEO, along with a phone number, address or contact email. (Try calling the number to see if anyone answers.) A website with only a contact form and no other way to get in touch with an actual human is suspicious.
As the name suggests, this magazine is all about cruising, so if you’ve spent time travelling on the open seas than this might be a good place to submit an article. They aren’t overly picky editors, but they do claim: “A good story cannot stand without quotes. Bring the people who you encountered into the story with their words and let them help you tell your story. Avoid trite phrases as quotes, though, such as “We had a wonderful time,” and “The food was delicious.””
Again, if your blog has a large reader base, then businesses may be interested in paying you to review their services or products. Not only will you get a free trial using whatever these businesses are selling, you will also get a fee for writing them a review and posting it to your site. Paid reviews (and other paid and sponsored content) can be big money, so advertise this service on your contact page to generate business.

Do you know your city like the back of your hand? Then consider signing up with an on-demand tour guide site like Vayable or Embark. With these sites you can take your love of the outdoors and make money by walking people around town, nature, the mountains, and more. Just create an adventure, list it on the site, and get paid when people book your walking tour.

Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
And since these tasks are super simple, just about anyone can do them! Amazon Turk is probably the largest micro job site out there — but it’s not the only one. Check out this list of short task sites to ‘join the crowd’ and gain access to thousands of mini internet jobs at any given time. If this sounds perfect for you, read through subreddits like UHRS Work and Hits Worth Turking For for tons of helpful advice from turkers like you 🙂

Massage therapy is a rewarding field, but starting out is tough. You have to build a client list or find a job at a massage center. That's where Zeel is looking to change things. The app lets clients connect with massage therapists for same-day massages in their homes. As the massage therapist, you receive a notification when someone near wants an appointment. Zeel says that massage therapists get a 75% cut of each payment, plus it automatically handles fees for late cancellations. For safety, Zeel says it has an ID verification system on the client side, and massage therapists can rate clients, so problematic ones get weeded out. It's currently available in over 50 cities.
Websites like Survey Junkie will pay you a decent chunk of change for the low-maintenance, borderline mindless task of completing surveys. Companies want to understand consumers better, and one way they do that is by compensating survey-takers (a.k.a. you). Most surveys pay between $0.50 and $1.25, and many of them take less than 5 minutes to do. You can read our full Survey Junkie review for more info.
×